THE SCRAMBLE FOR AFRICA DREW THE MAP OF AFRICA ..THE NEW SCRAMBLE FOR AFRICA IS DRAWING A NEW MAP OF AFRICA..South Sudan, North Nigeria, East Libya ..A NEW SCRAMBLE FOR AFRICA FOR A NEW WORLD ORDER

by Arthur Owiti

Again Charles Onyango Obbo rattles the beehive this time on whether the North Africa Revolt will spread to Africa.IN his view he sees a not so firm probability.For me it is inevitable.

WHY IS IT INEVITABLE ?

Just because a revolt is inevitable does not mean it will be successful. Revolts that are supported by the Rich Elite Nwo or Jesuit led powers will always be successful according to their plan.However Revolts that are succeeded against their plans will be ousted one time.Hence instead of waiting for some time to oust them, the Elite stop them with Police Machinery and Army machinery as is being seen in Libya.

Why is the Libyan situation still going on despite the evidence of violation of human rights ?? Could it be the Elite are protecting Gaddafi but in the open show enmity ?

Our point is as long as there is oppression there will be war .As long as there will be divergent views about something people will disagree hence the inevitability of resistance.

When the Missionaries went to Kikuyuland did all the Kikuyu become Western Christian ? NO .Hence the creation and rise of the Mau Mau who killed the Europeans while the Christina Kikuyu did not kill them.

Hence below are the divisions that will lead to revolt in or civil war and unrest in Africa (because Africans do not juts rest on ideology, they rest on religion and tribe which are united thus Africa is molded on Religious /Tribal ideology because the way of life was governed by the customs of the tribes ):

## WIKILEAKS WILL BE ONE OF THE MAIN FUELS OF REVOLT IN AFRICA, IF IT HAS DONE IT IN THE ARAB WORLD WHAT ABOUT AFRICA..SECRETS SHALL BE REVEALED AND FOR EVERY ACTION THERE IS A REACTION

1.Academic Civil War…..the Educated Youth v.the Educated Aged ,The Western Educated v Non Western educated, the Educated Youth/Aged v.the Rich Elite who use the Uneducated Youth /Aged

2.Tribal Civil War….. United tribes v Other United Tribes, Tribe v Tribe, Clans v Clans, County versus County (could someone tell me which language Kenyan county governments will use to govern themselves when we have homogeneous counties ??)

3.Economic Civil War… Trade Unions v Employers, Employees v Employers , Civil Servants v Government

4.Religious Civil War …. Islam v Western Christianity

5.Generational Civil War …Old v Young , War Witnesses v Non War Witnesses, British Colonized Population versus American/Africa Neo colonized Population

NEO COLONIALISM = NEO APARTHEID = REVOLT = NEW WORLD ORDER

Wait and See..Jesus said it , it has happened in the past it will happen again.

Arthur Owiti

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Violence in Libya is Africa’s future; Protests in Egypt and Tunisia its past

By CHARLES ONYANGO-OBBO
We need to take a new hard look at the “Arab Revolt” in North Africa, and what it says about what is coming in Africa.

Pro-democracy demonstrators ended Tunisian dictator Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali’s 23-year rule with about 10 days of protests.

They inspired the Egyptians, who took to the streets to end Hosni Mubarak’s 32-year stint at the top. The Egyptian dictator lasted longer than Ben Ali, about three weeks.

Then it was Libya’s turn. The nearly-deranged Col Muammar Gaddafi has proved that when a man has been an absolute ruler for 42 years, it takes some doing to run him out of town.

According to some estimates, Gaddafi’s supporters and army loyalists have murdered up to 3,000 opponents.

He has opened his armoury, and unleashed all the brutal force he can against the protesters’ machine-guns, grenades, tanks, naval ships, air force jets, name it.

Now the country is divided, with the dissidents holding the east and parts of the west, and Gaddafi fighting to take them back.

The viciousness of the regime means that the rebels will fight to the death to hold the territories under their control, because they know what will happen to them if Gaddafi defeats them. His regime will simply slaughter them.

Unlike Tunisia and Egypt, Gaddafi will take longer to uproot. Secondly, and more importantly, if he survives for long, Libya will end up a divided country.

There is sweet irony here, because last year, Gaddafi enraged Nigerians by saying that the solution to the country’s periodic bouts of killings between the largely Muslim north and Christian south was to divide the country.

What we are witnessing in Libya is the more natural outcome of Africa’s sectarian, violent and corrupt politics. What happened in Tunisia and Egyptian now seems to have been a fluke.

Why do we say that? If you look around you, the main grievances of political groups in Africa are mainly three:

First, that their regions (or tribes) are marginalised or neglected by the central government.

Secondly, that they are brutalised, raped and killed with impunity by security forces. Therefore, they don’t receive justice.

Thirdly, that they face discrimination in government jobs and tenders.

Whenever groups organise around these issues and it becomes their main consciousness, they are usually likely to push for separation or autonomy as a solution.

We have just seen that with the separation and independence of South Sudan from the bigger Sudan.

In Kenya, you find the same tensions between the Coastal and Northeast provinces and Nairobi.

In Zimbabwe, the Robert Mugabe regime has arrested Ndebele secessionists.

In Cameroon, the southern English-speaking bit wants out. In DR Congo, the divide between the east and west is sharp.

In South Africa, the differences between Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, and Western Cape Province are enough for them to be different countries.

Somalia has broken up into Puntland, Somaliland, and the far more chaotic south.

Therefore, the Libyan divide that is partly based on ethnicity and regions is more “natural”.

Which raises the question: Is what happened in Tunisia and Egypt the beginning or the end?

Many commentators have argued that Egypt and Tunisia are coming to the rest of Africa. Maybe not.

Both countries are on the way to having relatively more democratic governments, without a centre in Tunis and Cairo that had the power of the old dictatorships.

It is possible, then, that the next round of protests in Tunisia and Egypt could be based around regional agitation because a less tyrannical regime allows that kind of contest.

In that sense, Tunisia and Egypt are the beginning, not the end. Libya, on the other hand, is the end. It could be the future of the African countries that will fail to reform and democratise enough in the coming years, and discourage the growth of entrenched regional and tribal grievances that will result in separation.

Indeed, if Libya is to split, then the brutality of Gaddafi is a historical necessity, because it leaves a divided Libya as the only solution to the country’s crisis.

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